tentinybugs
Hello! I am Stephanie, a store supervisor for a plant nursery. I have a good camera and a passion for bugs. During the summer I post pics I've taken at work, and on the offseason, I reblog other interesting bug photos I find.
Personal blog: steffinephrine
tentinybugs
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adoptpets:

adoptpets:

Who’s a pretty boy? You are, yes you are!
Bee covered in pollen resting in the heart of a crocus flower.
Nature-loving photographer, Boris Godfroid, uses macro photography for close-up shots, posted to his website boris.godfroidbrothers.be


Happy 1st Day of Spring!
Plant some flowers for the bees.
adoptpets:

adoptpets:

Who’s a pretty boy? You are, yes you are!
Bee covered in pollen resting in the heart of a crocus flower.
Nature-loving photographer, Boris Godfroid, uses macro photography for close-up shots, posted to his website boris.godfroidbrothers.be


Happy 1st Day of Spring!
Plant some flowers for the bees.
adoptpets:

adoptpets:

Who’s a pretty boy? You are, yes you are!
Bee covered in pollen resting in the heart of a crocus flower.
Nature-loving photographer, Boris Godfroid, uses macro photography for close-up shots, posted to his website boris.godfroidbrothers.be


Happy 1st Day of Spring!
Plant some flowers for the bees.
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My friend dmjm92 took this picture while I was sleeping to announce that spring is officially here. The bees! The bees have come! 
Soon, the pictures will start up again! (I got a new macro lens for my phone and I can’t wait to see grasshopper faces up close!)
Lord of the Ants: E.O. Wilson
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lookitdaspidah:

josiephone:

Apparently some vegans are telling people not to eat honey to support bees.STOP. STOP NOW.DO YOU EVEN KNOW HOW BEES WORK?Buy honey (local if possible) -> support beekeepers -> support bees.I swear people don’t even think this stuff out. Beekeepers provide bees with an environment in which they can live, and are encouraged to thrive. Bees then have a big huge giant person who can deal with any threats to the hive. Yes, honey is a winter food supply for bees, but beekeepers (unless they’re dicks, in which case they’d be shooting themselves in the foot) will NEVER take too much honey from a hive, and will always ensure that bees have enough food. Think about it, you’re not going to starve a source of income/hobby, are you?So now.Support beekeepers.Support bees.buzz.

While I too wholeheartedly agree with this (and I love honey), I do also believe that beekeepers play a vital role in Colony Collapse Disorder.  Some recent research shows that the concentrations of neonicotinoids are nowhere near what was hypothesized making them a less likely culprit in CCD.  The article from Entomology Today is available here: <http://entomologytoday.org/2014/02/06/neonicotinoids-barely-found-in-pollen-of-seed-treated-plants/>
One hypothesis that has recently gotten a lot of support, and with which I agree (though it obviously needs more research) is the use of bee colonies as commercial pollinators.  Bees are loaded into trucks at shipped all across the U.S. during pollination season, something which could be incredibly stressful for the bees.  Anyone who has ever owned any kind of arthropod (like a tarantula, etc.) should be aware of the role of stress on the animals and how it can do terrible, terrible things to them.  Medical research has even shown how unhealthy stress is for humans.  Entomologists have postulated that the transportation can act as a stressor, thereby potentially weakening the immune systems of the colony.  Granted this isn’t the end all, be all, and many entomologists agree that the cause for CCD is likely multifaceted. We may never truly understand its causes.
However, I do still highly encourage everyone to consume honey.  It’s an amazing food, an antibiotic, it never expires, and honestly, I consider it vegan.  Veganism is against the consumption of animal byproducts (such as milks, cheeses, eggs, etc.).  Honey is made entirely out of plant nectar.  It is a plant product that is processed and harvested by the bees in their crop, it is something they do naturally, and it’s retrieved from the colonies in ways that will never harm the animals. If vegans are so worried about the consumption of animal products then perhaps they should research things such as food colorings (like Red #4, produced from scale insects) and the FDA’s Food Defect Action Levels (defined by them as: Levels of natural or unavoidable defects in food that present no health hazards for humans).  While the way I say this sounds harsh against vegans, I actually for the most part conform to vegan tendencies in food consumption for health reasons and for reasons against the meat & dairy industries.
In short, I apologize for the long rant, but I’d like to reiterate: Support Beekeepers.  Especially since they’re our first line of defense against Colony Collapse, because their very livelihoods depend on it.

"It is a plant product that is processed and harvested by the bees in their crop, it is something they do naturally, and it’s retrieved from the colonies in ways that will never harm the animals."This is, unfortunately, incorrect. I’m no vegan, and I love my honey, but I’m an advocate for bees because they provide probably the most important ecosystem service on earth. I’ve just done a seminar research project on the causes of CCD and the process of beekeeping. If you ever do research or see footage of honey production (see “More than Honey” on Netflix) you’ll see that the stress of dividing the bees, fabricating new colonies and forcing new queens (which are often attacked) on them causes the deaths of thousands of colonies, succumbing to parasites due to stress on their immune systems. In other situations, whole populations are “purged” by beekeepers because their pure bees bred with bees from a different area.Beekeeping was once a very sustainable and mutually beneficial partnership between us and the bees. But now that it’s become industrialized, just like every other natural resource, we’re on the brink of destroying something that is keeping our whole food market afloat.
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clusterpod:

Grasshopper, and mites!
Lyrebird Walk, near the Mount Granya summit, Mount Granya State Park, Victoria.
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tiny-creatures:

Damselfly by ER Post on Flickr.
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Adam Marshall Photography
Tumblr | Facebook |  Flickr
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mothernaturenetwork:

5,000 honeybees strap on tiny backpacks in the name of scienceAustralian scientists are attaching sensors to bees to track their movements and study colony collapse disorder.
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tiny-creatures:

Magical Moment by Hedi-Alana on Flickr.
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plasmatics-world:

little queen of green ~ by "Luigi Chiriocò"